Logo

Concrete Strategies for Inclusive Teaching - Shared screen with speaker view
Teshell Greene
27:51
Fear of being wrong
Lawrence Hobbie
27:56
fear of looking foolish
Usha Sankar
27:58
They don't want to be wrong
ROBIN HEYDEN
27:59
Embarrassed. Afraid they might answer incorrectly.
Madilynne Calderon
28:01
They would feel their answers were considered “dumb” or not feeling confident to answer
Tonya Bates
28:01
Nervous, not engaged, fear
Bonnie Mackneer
28:03
Afraid that their answer is wrong
Benita Brink
28:03
Are afraid they will have a wrong answer
martina rosenberg
28:07
They do not want to appear’stupid’ inferno t of their peers
Alex Benecke
28:08
afraid to be wrong
Sarah Lea Anglin
28:09
introverted
Cynthia Lebeaupin
28:12
Afraid of judgement from peers
Asha Rao
28:14
don't know the answer
Elizabeth Bastiaans
28:19
Unsure of correct answer, worried they'll be humiliated.
martina rosenberg
29:49
read and highlighted textbook
ROBIN HEYDEN
29:53
I spent so much TIME studying!
Valerie Kasay
29:58
Toobusy, working
Anne Baldwin
30:01
they cram for exams
Lawrence Hobbie
30:01
I studied really hard, felt like I knew the material, and then couldn't answer the questions
Tonya Bates
30:01
Read and re-read text
Sarah Lea Anglin
30:02
"I studied 24/7!"
Brandon Campitelli
30:05
not enough time to study
Elizabeth Bastiaans
30:06
I felt like I knew it in lecture, but they I did badly on the test.
Tonya Bates
30:09
Studied last minute
Teshell Greene
30:11
don’t have time for review sessions
Alex Benecke
30:17
they are doing well in all of their other classes but don't have time for this class
Asha Rao
30:19
i studied a lot but am not sure why i didn't do well
Sarah Lea Anglin
30:20
I had to study for XXXXX instead.
Usha Sankar
30:25
Tutoring sessions were not at convenient times
Benita Brink
30:28
Focused on the wrong material
Sarah Lea Anglin
41:32
defining reporter; timing definite
Glen Davenport
41:34
Hi Everyone, just a reminder to switch to 'All Panelists and Attendees' so we can all see your answers!
Usha Sankar
41:35
Providing time to think
Tonya Bates
41:45
Timer, instructions for reporter
Lawrence Hobbie
41:46
By encouraging a quiet time for individual thinking followed by group discussion--allows everyone, even "slower thinkers", to participate
Usha Sankar
41:51
And then being prompted to share
Heather McGray
41:52
directed who has role
Elizabeth Bastiaans
41:57
Students know their role and what they should be doing in each moment.
Jeffrey Olimpo
42:13
Presenting a task that is ideally accessible for all participants
martina rosenberg
43:02
What about colorblind people?
Gabriella Kirkley
44:01
Good point Robbie!
Heather McGray
52:14
sit down and ask them personally about their goals and how you can support them
Frank Castelli
52:29
Promote growth mindset by saying that practice is how one improves.
Lawrence Hobbie
52:30
I try to meet with all students individually in the first 2-3 weeks to get to know them and encourage them to come see me for help if necessary.
Cinzia Sevignani
52:30
I invite them to office hours
Brandon Campitelli
52:35
[try] to remember names
kweglarz
52:37
I tailor my content based on their interests
Elizabeth Bastiaans
52:37
Explain that part of why you use active learning is to give more students ability to participate.
Jessica Bickel
52:59
Stating belief in a growth mindset. Anyone can succeed in this course (physics).
Gabriella Kirkley
53:40
Martina, we’ll have a discussion/ Q&A at the end when we can bring up your question about colorblind students
Glen Davenport
56:10
Just a quick reminder to change your chat to 'All panelists and attendees' so everyone can see your question!
Lawrence Hobbie
56:52
I find that teaching a high structure course, with many assignments and prompt feedback, is a lot of work--any tips on making this manageable?
Cinzia Sevignani
56:54
I often use color too...
Rachelle Spell
57:33
Is there a limit to the amount of structure? Someday, the students will be in a class that does not support them as well. Will they be able to self-regulate?
Jessica Bickel
57:35
A colleague of mine is color blind and so I can run them past him. He let another colleague know that green/red for highlighting correct answer/incorrect was hard to see and he could adjust.
Cinzia Sevignani
58:33
Would be useful/possible to have colorblind test?
Robbie Pock
58:58
I would like to second Rachelle Spell’s question.
Jessica Bickel
01:00:05
How does your structure approach change from intro-level to upper-level?
Frank Castelli
01:00:35
Self-regulation could be taught/modeled in your class and students can take that elsewhere.
Theodore Stankowich
01:03:08
Would it be better to go over answers to out-of-class practice q's at the start of the next class or would having answers be only available online after completion be better. The latter forces students to complete the practice work and might incentivize them to actually do it, rather than just coming to class to listen to the answer. Would like your thoughts on getting them to actually do the out-of-class non-graded practice work.
Janelle Bettis
01:03:31
Would you say there are any key differences in teaching at undergrad vs graduate?
Janelle Bettis
01:04:40
Yes, thank you!
Frank Castelli
01:06:32
Hi Ted! I might have your assignment graded at low stakes but greater than zero. Low point value or drop the lowest 1-3.
Frank Castelli
01:07:06
Also, graded as done or not done, not based on quality of answers.
Elizabeth Everman
01:07:28
What are some suggestions for covering the material that needs to be covered while still taking time to make sure students have the time they need to think
Rachelle Spell
01:09:29
I would like you opinion on stability in teaching content and technology. A lot of work creating structure and supporting inclusive teaching are lost once the course changes or the classroom management system is changed. It’s exhausting.
Frank Castelli
01:09:38
Elizabeth, you could "flip" and have some content presented online before the lecture meeting. You could also tell yourself it's better to cover less content well so students really know that content rather than cover more content but students end up learning less. I'm curious about what others think.
Alissa Bans
01:09:41
One type of assessment that I suspect many of us like to use to understand student learning is to have our students apply learned concepts to new applications. No matter how many structured assignments & activities I give that also involve new applications, I keep running into students worried after exams because they “didn’t know the material”. How to I ameliorate their concerns?
Alissa Bans
01:11:22
*do I *
Susan Ferency
01:12:30
I sometimes Flip my classroom so lectures are recorded and listened to outside of class. in class, inclusive activities such as Think-Pair-Share or Quizlet Live is done.
Kristin Patterson
01:13:32
I appreciate you all facilitating this conversation. I don’t see teaching with structure as “coddling” in any context. I see it as treating students as human beings. When I think about my own behavior in many work and learning contexts, I know that structure helps me manage my time and focus effort appropriately, and I want to give my students opportunities to show what they can do and get better over time.
Susan Ferency
01:14:06
to help students not worry about the upcoming test, I have them write test questions as a study tool.
Frank Castelli
01:20:48
Yes, Thank you!
Cinzia Sevignani
01:21:03
Thank you very much!
Leo Chen
01:21:15
Here is the post-webinar survey link! https://yalesurvey.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3ZQucMlbG8H6MaF
Rachelle Spell
01:22:03
Thank you for modeling supportive structure in your presentation!
Avis Jackson
01:22:11
thank you
Alissa Bans
01:22:19
Thank you